The Mighty Burke Analysis

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Register to read the introduction…It is said that a foreman mason lived under bad conditions. He had to do hard work and for that, he was not well paid. He had to build “concrete platforms, culverts, coalbins, sidewalks, and, in fact, anything that could be made out of cement” (42). For that, “the corporation […] paid him two and a half day for ten hours’ work, as well as the superintendence and construction of what he was doing” (42). Besides the bad conditions, the text also tells us about how nature was like before it became built over: the storyteller and the foreman mason were “at Williamsbridge, a little station on the Harlem, building a coal bin. It was a pretty place surrounded by trees and a grass-plot, which, after the long confinement of the shop, seemed to me a veritable haven of rest”…show more content…
Some places had only one-story buildings, others were bigger. In the late nineteenth century, however, there were a lot of buildings, railroads and a better infrastructure overall. Comparing these facts, we can state that the Bronx underwent a huge development of infrastructure. This is due to the process of Urbanization and Industrialization, The city of New York surely became bigger in the Urbanization time. Westchester and Morrisania, which are mentioned among others in 'Satanstoe ', were annexed to the city. The annexation made it possible to build several things in areas outside of town: "[w]e had a platform to lay at Morrisania, a chimney to build at Tarrytown, a sidewalk to lay at Whiteplains" (44) and much more things Supposedly the wealthier people moved to the outer parts, while the immigrants lived downtown. Urbanization is, next to other factors, related to many immigrants in the US. In 'The Mighty Burke ' there are many Italians and Irishmen mentioned. We can also see in 'The Mighty Burke ' that immigrants are more willing to do the hard work than the natives do…show more content…
It is said that a foreman mason lived under bad conditions. He had to do hard work and for that, he was not well paid. He had to build “concrete platforms, culverts, coalbins, sidewalks, and, in fact, anything that could be made out of cement” (42). For that, “the corporation […] paid him two and a half day for ten hours’ work, as well as the superintendence and construction of what he was doing” (42). Besides the bad conditions, the text also tells us about how nature was like before it became built over: the storyteller and the foreman mason were “at Williamsbridge, a little station on the Harlem, building a coal bin. It was a pretty place surrounded by trees and a grass-plot, which, after the long confinement of the shop, seemed to me a veritable haven of rest” (43). Comparing 'Satanstoe ' and 'The Mighty Burke ' with regard to Urbanization and Industrialization in the

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