Comparing Jealousy And All Summer In A Day

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Jealousy is a key feature in both the movie and the story of "All Summer in a Day." Jealousy is what keeps them more exciting and fun to read. But, there is a big difference between the movie and the story of how jealousy was shown. Jealousy is shown different through Margot, William and the other kids, and the plot, throughout both examples. In both the story and the movie of “All Summer in a Day,” it is clearly shown that there is much jealousy that can be found through Margot. For example, this happens when, in both the movie and the story, the children are running out to the sun. The text states, "And the jungle burned with sunlight as the children, released from their spell, rushed out, yelling, into the springtime... And then-- In the midst of their running, one of the girls wailed. Everyone stopped. The girl, standing in the open, held out her hand. 'Oh, look, look, ' she said, trembling. They came slowly to look at her opened palm. In the center of it, cupped and huge, was a single raindrop... Then one of them gave a little cry. 'Margot! ' 'What? ' 'She 's still in…show more content…
Additionally, there is a lot of difference between the film and the story of “All Summer in a Day” in the way of jealousy, when it is shown through William and the other kids. When, in the movie, all of the children are painting, William finishes his painting and thinks of it as a fantastic piece, but Margot completes hers first. She then gives it to the teacher, and the teacher shows it off to the class, saying it was excellent. William then looks down at his writing thinking it is horrid, so he crumples it up and throws it on the floor. This scene does not occur in the story but is a crucial part that adds to the movie. This scene of jealousy shows how he has envy for Margot, and scenes similar to this often happen throughout both the film and the story. In the story, a scene occurs where all of the children in Margot 's class lock her in the closet, as the text states,
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