Comparing Rapunzel In Children's And Household Tales

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Rapunzel, Rapunzel Fairytales bring joy and hope to the reader. At least the fairytales society knows today. But what were the original versions like? Many stories have aspects that change over time, however the major plot stays roughly the same. In 1812, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published the original written version of Rapunzel in Children’s and Household Tales. Similar stories had been written before this, however the Grimm Brothers provided the story that today’s readers know and love. Over the years, the story has become various other types of literature, including a Disney movie, known as Tangled. By examining the original version from 1812 and the movie from 2010, many similarities can be drawn, but it is also clear that culture, time…show more content…
First debuting in 1812, is the famous line, that has never been forgotten- “Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your hair” (Rapunzel). This excerpt has remained constant throughout every version of Rapunzel. In the film Tangled, both Flynn and Mother Gothel say, “Rapunzel. Rapunzel, let down your hair” (Tangled). This quote is vital to the story and remains in all versions, because it reveals to the reader that Rapunzel’s excessively long hair is the only way in or out of the tower, which makes her escape much more difficult. Secondly, in both versions, Rapunzel’s father looks for an antidote to save his wife. Consequently, this leads to Gothel abducting Rapunzel. Her abduction takes in place in both versions, immediately after her birth. Finally, in both accounts, it is Rapunzel’s tears that save her love. While there may be some minuscule differences, the major plot stays…show more content…
For example, the Grimm’s version is much darker. There was a bleak and gloomy outlook on life during the 1800’s. In fact, “Louis Snyder, in his book “Roots of German Nationalism” (1978), has a whole chapter on what he sees as the Grimms’ celebration, and encouragement, of pernicious national traits: “obedience, discipline, authoritarianism, militarism, glorification of violence,” and, above all, nationalism” (Acocella). The German culture made the original Rapunzel as gruesome as it was, which, inevitably, was later changed. Joan Acocella continues to
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