Comparing The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe

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C. S. Lewis’ masterpiece The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe uses descriptive writing and a variety of interesting characters to retell the story of Christ’s sufferings to save His people from their sins. Structured around the actual story of Jesus’ sacrifice for humanity, Lewis’ book focuses on the spiritual journey of the four Pevensie children: Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. Lucy, the youngest of the four siblings, first discovers the secret of the grand wardrobe. At first, no one believes her when she tells them of her adventures in the land of Narnia, a place where winter lasts forever, but Christmas never comes. However, Edmund, Peter, and Susan all eventually meet Aslan, the Great Lion, for themselves. Sadly, trouble arises as the four children try to save the magical world of Narnia from the clutches of the evil White Witch, otherwise known as Queen Jadis.
Quite wittingly, the White Witch lures Edmund into believing that she can give him power if he brings his siblings to her. When two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve fill the four thrones, Narnia would break free from the Witch’s eternal winter spell. But when Edmund agrees to the Witch’s offer, he shatters the only way of stopping the White Witch from ruling Narnia forever. After Aslan forgives
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Since everyone has faced times of hardship before, they can all relate to Edmund’s story and experience his every thought and emotion. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe has beautiful, simple writing style and the ability to accurately portray man’s sinful nature also contribute the book’s clarity. Lewis’ constant use of portraying people and God through the Pevensies and Aslan make the book an even more interesting story. This masterfully told tale of forgiveness and salvation fills the reader’s mind with the importance of

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