Comparing Victor Frankenstein And The Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Victor Frankenstein and the monster share many similarities and differences. The monster does not share the same physical stature as Victor, instead they share some of the same personality traits, and for example, they are both very loving and want to help people who need it. In the novel we see how Victor and the monster share differences, but as the novel goes on, we see how they become more alike. The characters both experience alienation; they both assume the role of a creator, and they both experience love and loss in the novel. Victor and the monster are similar through their experience with love and loss. Although the monster is very young he has dealt with the loss of many people, including the family…show more content…
The monster sees himself as both Adam and Satan, because like Adam, he was created and set free. Yet he feels like Satan because of how society treats him. While Adam has a companion, the creature longs for one and begins to threaten Victor that if he does not create one, he will harm those around him. In comparison, Victor also feels like characters from Paradise Lost. Victor assumes that role of Satan. Victor portrayals Satan because he has attempted to assume God’s role. In this novel Victor’s actions do not contribute to any good outcomes, instead they destroy his family, and hurt several people along the way. One of the repeated themes in Frankenstein is the feeling recalled when Victor or the creature think of their fathers. Victor’s father, who is Alphonse Frankenstein, and the monsters father, which is Victor. “No father watched my infant days” (Shelley 106) the monster needs a father figure to guide him and teach him like Alphonse did for Victor, but instead the monster is left too his own devices and eventually teaches himself how to talk and how to take care of
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