Comparison Of The Nativist And American Imperialist Movement

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Although on paper the nativist and American Imperialist movements seem reasonable and alluring, they are corrupt and harmful to those affected by them. The nativist movement was born in the 1830’s around a series of ideals prioritizing the interests of white Americans over those of immigrants and foreigners. Later, the American Imperialism movement was formed through the United States desire to control and expand starting in the late 19th century. These movements were influenced by a number of factors, notably by intolerance of diversity. Nativism and imperialism were deeply influenced by religion. Both wanted to spread Christianity to the world and wanted to eradicate unfit religions. The ideas of this eradication of different religions carried …show more content…

The nativism movement despised the Roman Catholic Church, which is represented in The American Patriot. The newspaper clipping bluntly states the opposition of nativists to Roman Catholicism. Later during the late 19th century, similar intolerance resurfaced in the imperialist movement. Many devout worshipers felt “imperialism was a religious duty.” People like Josiah Strong, an American clergyman, believed that the “United States must expand its global influence in order to convert non-Christians around the world” and “it was the duty of Americans to promote Christian beliefs everywhere… non-Christians were uncivilized and in need of protection.” Not only did the religious intolerance of nativism extend to a simmilar intolerance in imperialism, it grew in severity. The principle even became a keystone in the foundation of the American imperialist movement, religion being used to justify imperialism. Nativism had introduced the idea that certain religions were superior to others, and this superiority complex of nativists led to the introduction of …show more content…

Supporters of imperialism believed in making America a global power; that American control would be beneficial to the world. This conceited idea stems from the very principle nativists built their entire ideology upon, the superiority of the United States. To imperialists and nativists the “most fit” race was was the white American. Nativists believed that American born people, excluding people of color, should receive priority over immigrants. Along with this came many pieces of nativist propaganda implying that other races were to incompetent to participate in civilized democracy. This idea that white Americans were the only people who were adequately equipped to participate in government made itself known during the age of American imperialism. The 1899 poem The White Man's Burden by Rudyard Kipling, demonstrates perfectly the ideas of white supremacy held during the imperialist movement. Within the poem, Kipling encourages and supports the imperialization of the Philippines by the United States, implying that it is the duty and burden of white men to help the less fit. This notion stems from the roots of nativism. It shows directly that imperialism was supported and built on nativist ideals through its connection to American supremacy. Not only did the ideas of individuals during the age of American imperialism support the connection between nativism and imperialism but the very act of imperialism

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