Comparsion Of Women In Shakespeare's Othello

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The strongest friendship is between Desdemona, the princess and wife of Othello and, Emilia, Desdemona 's attendant as well as Iago 's wife. Together throughout this tragedy, these friends battle the men in their lives. However, the way these go about it are completely different. There are two types of women, the ones who allow to be eaten, and the ones who don 't. Because of Emilia 's personality, she does not allow herself to be eaten, unlike Desdemona. Emilia is the practical and confident woman of her time. Unlike Desdemona, she understands why some women would cheat. Because “They[men] are all but stomachs, and we all but food;/ They eat us hungerly, and when they are full/ They belch us.(3.4.120)” Emilia can clearly tell the difference between most men and women. Men use women for their benefit, and once they are done, they are simply done. As for women she feels that they are only purpose for the benefit of the men. And if the woman is not satisfied by her husband, then who 's to say they can 't do the same? However, Desdemona does not share those same views. She repeatedly refers to Othello as her her “lord” and does everything he says. Plus she still does not fully comprehend why some women would cheat; after all, that is “such a wrong for the whole world!(4.3.87)” She believes that once you are married, you are blinded together, and that bond is not supposed to be…show more content…
Both Emilia and Desdemona have a battle against the men. Previously shown, they both go about it in different ways. But in the end both die from love. Desdemona repeatedly told Othello that she was not guilty of being a “strumpet”, but because of the lies Iago told him, he killed her. While she was taking her last breaths she replied to Emilia 's question, “Nobody. I myself. Farewell./ Commend me to my kind lord. O, farewell.(5.2.152)” Why didn 't Desdemona tell her best friend who had killed her? Because she loved her dear lord Othello, and knew he acted upon his clouded

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