Competitiveness In Business Process

1008 Words5 Pages
With the advent of technology that spearheaded the implementation of the mass media, businesses and enterprises have sprouted like mushrooms after the rain, all over the world. Wherein the past century, businesses are done “physically”-through face-to-face dealing with buyers and customers, nowadays many people are making profits through online dealing with customers. It is the World Wide Web that enables companies to reach the markets and to compete with the traditional store based retailers (de Kare-Silver, 1998). Due to the fact that online businesses offer lower risks, higher accessibility and lower costs, a situation of increased competitiveness have emerged. As organizations or business operators, how can one ensure that their company…show more content…
The main focus is relationship development and customer retention. They believe that successful implementation of CRM will garner loyalty among customers and bring more profit in the long run. CRM requires cross-functional business process re-engineering. According to the researchers, CRM technology applications link front desk operations (e.g. customer service, marketing and sales) to back office (e.g. human resources, logistics and financial) functions with the company’s customer “touch points” (Fickel, 1999). A touch point is a mean through which a customer comes into contact with the company through any means at any time available. Therefore, a company can have touch points such as Internet, e-mail, call centers, fax, stores etc. Often, these touch points are controlled by separate information systems. It is hard to navigate between several systems when collecting data about a customer. Hence, CRM integrates touch points and leverages all the functions within the company. CRM applications enable organizations to check on customer loyalty and profitability measured through repeat purchases and money…show more content…
Moreover, regardless of the channel used to contact the company, whether it is the sales representatives or the Internet, customers should receive similar efficient service. Vendors who produced CRM applications such as Oracle, SAS, SAP and etc. are anxious to sell off their latest product to the organizations. Many of these are vendors that develop for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. There are significant differences between ERP and CRM. ERP provides a strong foundation for back office functions while CRM links front and back office applications to maintain relationships with customers. ERP integrates functional areas of business with customers and suppliers; CRM improves customer touch points. ERP addresses fragmented information systems; CRM addresses fragmented customer
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