Comunicative Classroom

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Research indicates that the communicative approach communicative classroom is the most effective method of teaching a foreign language. A communicative classroom is described as one in which comprehensible elements of language are practiced in a real world context. The focus of the classroom is to encourage interaction and communication between the students. In order to determine if the CA is being applied in university foreign language classrooms, interviews and observations were conducted to examine the application of current research on the CA. The present study includes interviews of two foreign language instructors and six observations of their classrooms. These interactions reveal important dynamics within…show more content…
Introduction; the ability to communicate effectively in English is now a well- established goal in English Language training . many adults can i dentify personal needs to communicate in spoken and written English and many schoolchildren are aware of future needs of international communication and mobility . Even in context where it is harder to see future purpose for English language communication among schoolchildren , it is often nevertheless thought to be sensible to build potential for this . A brief review of statements form syllabus specification and introduction to course books will demonstrate the extent to which communicative ability has become a goal and communicative practice has become part of classroom procedure . The implications for the communicative classroom; the communicative approach to language teaching is premised on the belief that , if the development of communicative language ability is the goal of classroom learning , then communicative practice must be part of the process . not everyone would agree with this 'product implies process ' argument .t . there are certainly successful language learner…show more content…
The extensively revised second edition of Andrew Cohen’s Assessing Language Ability in the Classroom, as its title suggests, is concerned with assessment as it impacts on the experience of teachers and learners in the communicative classroom. The volume, directed to a broad audience of language educators and teachers in training, provides clear guidelines to assist practitioners to evaluate and develop assessment instruments. In addition, Cohen offers numerous example s to illustrate the ongoing daily assessment that forms part of a well- conceived language class. Cohen broadens the meaning of the term testing from its usual restricted sense to include “the collection of any data that can be used to assess the language abilities of respondents”. This broader definition, then, allows scope for discussion not only of traditional topics such as different types of validity and item analysis, but also for a review of currently popular trends such as self-assessment and portfolio assessment
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