Concept Of Liberalism In International Relations

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The intention of this paper, is to critically outline the theory of liberalism in international relations. However, as a consequence of the constant changing nature of space and time, the contemporary terms used to encamp each school of liberal thought, have manifested and changed in accordance with major and significant global events. Compelling events, such as the two world wars and 9/11, along with others. The changing internalisation of differing social norms, partly as a result of the magnitude of war, has had a massive altering impact on the concept of liberalism. Consequently, it is essential that this exercise delivers an overview of the different guises, which pertain to liberal theory. Furthermore, the essay will continue by critically…show more content…
However, as alluded to in the introduction, there are three loose forms of liberalism in international relations. The first, liberal internationalism, with its origins in the eighteenth-century and the enlightenment epoch. Revolved around, the interaction of states. And diplomacy between these powerful national actors. The second, often referred to as idealism, is argued, was never really a thought process, but was more geared towards the ideals of socialism. Finally, and endemic since the 1970’s, is the concept of liberal institutionalism. Generally, liberalism in international relations has been used to challenge the belief, that nation states were immovable political actors. Ultimately, liberalism professes to have the confidence that, both the state and human nature can change over…show more content…
Actors, above and beyond the capabilities of nation states. Multinational organisations like the oil cartels, the rise of non-governmental organisations and International charities, to name but a few, all began to emerge as significant players in international relations. The impact, of these new political actors was exposed by the oil crisis, in 1973. The realisation, that sovereign countries were no longer the only entities with the capabilities to influencing world order, lead to the advent of Liberal Institutionalism. This is where it diverges from other forms of liberalism. Institutionalism is not necessarily interested, per say, in human behaviour. However, the theory is concerned with, the emergence of the differing political actors and how they can potentially impact world stability. The cobweb model, of interconnected international actors, was put forward by John Burton in his book World Society. Burton advocates, instead of seeing the world as only consisting of dominated cluster of states, which are always geared for war. Conversely, he argues, that the world should be viewed as a complex web, consisting of a myriad of various interconnected actors. Furthermore, that all actors in the web should be considered, regardless of size and their propensity for war. Burton puts forward a model that, made provision for the appreciation of soft power. Which, is something that tends to
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