Conclusion Of Globalization

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Over the years, numerous authors have attempted to define globalization; however, this simple word comprises so many aspects, and involves such diverse elements, that has been impossible to agree on one single definition of the term. According to UNESCO: “Globalisation is a process in which the people and countries of the world are being brought closer and closer together, economically and culturally, through trade, information technology, travel, cultural exchanges, the mass media and mass entertainment.” Similarly, Joseph Stiglitz, former Senior Vice-President of the World Bank and winner of the Nobel Prize for Economics, in his book Globalization and its Discontents (2002) defines globalization as: “… the closer integration of the countries…show more content…
Although globalization has several advocates and fervent critics, it is important to clarify that globalization per se is neither “good” nor “bad”. As a matter of fact, your appreciation of this phenomenon will depend on your experience with globalization and the positive or negative impact of it on your life. In his book New Genesis: Shaping a Global Spirituality (1982) Robert Muller, Assistant Secretary-General of the UN (United Nations) for forty years and known as “the father of global education” posed a challenge to governments and…show more content…
In fact, the first step towards valuing others is understanding and valuing ourselves. Having that in mind, it is important that teachers educate our students about our national identity and cultural diversity. By doing so, students not only will be able to celebrate our heterogeneity, but also that of other countries. Moreover, they need to know that differences are to be cherished, rather than feared or judged. First and foremost, in Chile as in other countries there is a cultural diversity dominated by indigenous groups. The most numerous are the Mapuche, who represent an 87.3 % of indigenous population, followed by the Aymara with 7 %, and the Atacameño with 3 %. To these we can add the: Quechua, Rapanui, Colla, Alacalufe, and Yagan groups. (Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas, Estadísticas Sociales de los Pueblos Indígenas en Chile, Censo 2002). As a result, the cultural richness of our nation proves necessary to teach our students about these peoples’ history, language, and meaningful contributions to our present society, and then focusing on learning and accepting the variety of people in other nations. Because accepting diversity is at the same time recognizing difference, the point is not that all people should be treated equal, rather that differences should be accepted, taken into account, and all people should be treated with respect and fairness. “When equality ignores relevant
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