Concussion Laws In Sports

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Although practically every state bases their youth concussion laws on the Lystedt law, some States have taken the safety of youth athletes to heart and enacted legislations that is comprehensive and effective. For example, Rhode Island enacted its concussion laws in 2011, just two years after Lystedt Law. One unique aspect of the Rhode Island laws is that it requires that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention material on concussion be used when implementing concussion education programs and also made available to all coaches, voluntaries and parents in a localized, easy to access website. The statute requires all coaches, voluntaries involved in athletics , and school nurses to competes concussion and traumatic training courses and annual…show more content…
In 2011 the Colorado legislator took a step to protecting youth athletes form the dangers of second-impact syndrome by requiring that educations course cover not only the dangers of a concussion, but the dangers of multiple concussion. Colorado even expanded its law’s scope beyond those of California, requiring that private clubs, public recreation facilities, and athletic leagues sponsoring youth athletic activities comply with the requirements of the concussion laws. Pennsylvania has even gone as far to provide for statutory penalties for a coach who does not comply with the statutory “return to play” requirements. Connecticut imposes educational requirements on student athletes and their parents or guardians regarding concussion. Demonstrating a strong understating of where youth concussion pose the most risk, Connecticut also requires that football coaches undergo best practice training on dealing with football specific concussions. However, not all states have acted to improve on Lystedt…show more content…
Wyoming’s youth concussion laws fall short of even the base guideline set by Lystedt law. The Wyoming statute on concussions fails to require removal from play when there is a suspicion that a student athlete has sustained a concussion. This egregious failure presents the single most dangerous scenario of youth athletics and concussion—creating an environment where a player can remain in play despite demonstrating symptoms of a concussion. This very real scenario has resulted in countless deaths, including Zachary Lystedt. The Wyoming statute does not require participation in concussion educational programs, signed informed consent documents explaining the dangers of concussion to parents and student athletes. Moreover, the few protections that statute does create only apply to public schools, leaving recreational sports and private schools out of the legislation
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