Confederation Vs Constitution

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With the victory against England the newly independent Americans earned an official claim to America and needed to establish a written plan of government for the new states. The Americans sought to implement some form of sovereignty without total power or any influences of monarchy. In 1777, the congressmen generated the Articles of Confederation, defining the union as a “loose confederation of states” existing mainly to “foster a common defense” (Roark 190). However, the Articles of Confederation had many flaws and imperfections. Because it provoked too many conflicts, the Articles of Confederation resulted in failure and was ultimately overturned by an improved document of government, the Constitution. One of the reasons the Articles of…show more content…
Some of the conflicts in the construction of the constitution are the two different plans. The Virginia Plan, formulated by James Madison who advocated the Constitution, set out a three-branch government which composed of a “chamber legislature, a powerful executive, and a judiciary” which was to operate directly on people, not on the state (Roark 208). In this plan, the executive and judiciary could jointly veto the actions of Congress to prevent it from having too much power. An alternative plan was the New Jersey Plan that retained the confederation’s single-house congress with one vote per state. Other conflict that stemmed from the formation of the Constitution was the development of two different groups; the Federalists, those who supported the Constitution and the Antifederalists, those who did not support the Constitution. Federalists sought to reform the government system by implementing an executive power to act as a mediator for states so that no specific state had more power than the other and so that critical deeds can be executed without problem, such as collecting taxes. Anti-Federalists wanted to stray away from an authoritative power, fearing that a powerful and distant government would not serve for the interests and needs of the citizens. They also complained that the Constitution failed to guarantee individual liberties in…show more content…
In early American history, there were many different Americans that had different visions for America. One great leader for instance, George Washington, was one individual of many who saw the great potential in America as independent from the control of Britain. Three men in particular all had different, yet similar, visions of America all in the interest of what would serve America best, in their opinions. Alexander Hamilton sought to improve the economic status of America, John Adams sought to improve America in accordance to the vision of the Federalists, while Thomas Jefferson sought to change the country in the vision of the
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