Conflict In Frankenstein

1136 Words5 Pages
Similarly to the outside world, a recurring theme in literature revolves around conflict between parent and child. Often times, this type of conflict can result in residual feelings of hatred, disrespect, or other issues between two characters linked by blood. Parallels between literary fiction and reality are linked by similar events, such as a child finding him or herself stemming outward from ideologies of a parent, seeking to explore individualism through rebellion. Although a somewhat unorthodox parent-child relationship, the novelFrankenstein” portrays many aspects of this theme. Serving as a “father” of sorts to the monster, Victor Frankenstein’s negligence to accept his creation proved to be his downfall. In the novel “Frankenstein”…show more content…
In pursuit of his own journey toward justice, the monster’s killing of Victor’s loved ones embodies his goal of personal justice through the destruction of Victor’s life. While creating the female monster, Victor’s questioning of the true outcome powers his urge to seek justice through destroying his creation. Despite threats from the monster, Frankenstein’s decision to destroy it expresses him learning from his prior mistakes, regardless of the consequences that result. Although the monster states, “I shall be with you on your wedding night,(Shelley,123).” Victor cannot forgive himself for the horror he unleashed on the world and instead sees his actions as a sacrifice to prevent a repetition of the terror the monster has wreaked. After Elizabeth’s death, this feeling of justice remains in Victor, as his willingness to die in order to kill the monster becomes his only sense of purpose. Throughout the novel, Victor repeatedly attempts to redeem himself after the consequences of his actions have already occurred. The creation of the monster, the deaths of William, Clerval, and Elizabeth, and Justine’s conviction are all events that trigger his strive to seek justice for to those who were subjects of the monster’s evildoing,—only after it is too late. All of the monster’s actions committed to giving it meaning in life are targeted at his creator, of whom does not consider the…show more content…
The deviation of family traditions, or in the novel, a lack of parental background may negatively affect the child. Victor’s continuous rejection of the monster fuelled its rage and conquest to rid Frankenstein’s life of all happiness. As a “child” to Frankenstein, the monster’s reaction to being rejected permanently scars him, forever being the testament to his existence. Losing Victor’s acceptance is a loss held closely to the monster, reflecting upon human tendency to reject those dissimilar or unappealing. Because Frankenstein is the monster’s creator, his “God,” his “father,” the monster’s actions, fuelled by anger, creates conflict that leads to both of their eventual deaths, displaying how significantly rejection by a parent can damage a
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