Conflicts That Occur In The Outsiders

687 Words3 Pages
It’s The Greasers’ Fault The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton, is a book full of realistic conflict, in that it goes against the stereotypical happy ending. The Outsiders is about the Greasers, a teen gang in Oklahoma who are rivals with the Socials, struggling to find their way in life. When Johnny and Ponyboy, two Greasers, get involved in a fight that results in the death of a Soc, they are forced to run away. Throughout the book, the Greasers are forced to overcome the challenges of their gang lifestyle. Above all, the Greasers’ violent ways of life are to blame for most of the consequences that they face in the book. The Greasers’ violent ways of life mean that they are forced to contend with the repercussions of their wrongdoings. For example, Johnny and Ponyboy started the fight in which Bob was killed by being verbally aggressive. This illustrates how Ponyboy let the Socs provoke him and then tried to insult them, calling the Socs “white trash with Mustangs and madras.” (48) to provoke them, also. And because Ponyboy wanted to go further, he spit at them. The Greasers were responsible for starting…show more content…
The book is about a teen gang in Oklahoma, the Greasers, that are rivals with the Socials, the rich kids of their neighborhood. When Johnny, one of the Greasers murders a Soc while trying to defend he and Ponyboy, another Greaser, they have to go into hiding. The book conveys the feelings that Ponyboy expresses about he and his gang overcoming the challenges of being in the Greaser gang and all the consequences that come with it. It tells about the feelings of being in a gang, and the importance of appreciating what you have, because it might not always be there. Later in the book, when Johnny dies, his last words are “Stay gold, Ponyboy”, probably since the Greasers have quite the reputation for doing just the
Open Document