Congressional Limits

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Limits to Congressional Terms The only constant thing in America is change; except when it comes to the congressional member that govern our country. Many political pundits questioned how a junior senator from Illinois became President of the United States; because of change. The America people want it but Congress is having none of it. Legislation to limits congressional terms is not as published as gun control, but it is a domestic policy issue that many American are very concerned about. The founding fathers of America did not indent careerism in politics. Imposing limits on congressional terms is the only way for true democracy to flourish. The issue of limits to congressional term is not a new topic of debate in the United States.…show more content…
Once their term was complete, they returned to the lives and career in their state of origin (Vance, 1994, 429). Not convinced, refer to Roger Sherman (founding father), “The representatives ought to return home and mix with the people. By remaining at the seat of the government, they will acquire the habits of the place, which might differ from those of the constituents...” (Vance, 1994, 429). Fast forward to Congress of the 21st century, there average term for most congressmen is well over 30 years. If you were to perform a website for “who is the longest serving member of the Senator,” you will see Democrat Robert C Byrd, 51 years of serves (1959 to 2010; Democratic Daniel K. Inouye , 49 years of serves (1963 to 2012) and Republican Strom Thurmond, 47 years of serves (1954 to 2003) (U.S. Senate: Longest Serving Senators, 2015). It is also interesting to note that of these three, all died in office with the exception of Strom Thurmond who technically stepped down before he died six months later. Tyranny has clearly crept back in government when congressional member are allowed to remain in office for more than 30 years (Vance, 1994, 429). Limits on congressional terms are clearly needed and are necessity to uphold the founding fathers’ intention of a democratic process that allows every citizen the privilege to participate in the political system; and to prevent unfair advantages given to
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