Consequences Of Love And Death In Shakespeare's Othello

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In the play Othello, written by Shakespeare, the death of Othello and Desdemona help illuminate important themes present throughout the play. Once Othello passes over Iago for a special position, Iago sets out to destroy all that Othello loves. Meanwhile, Othello falls hopelessly in love with Desdemona and gives Iago the perfect opportunity to collect his vengeance. Iago consistently manipulates the truth to construct the allusion that Desdemona and Cassio are having an affair. Specifically, Act V illustrates Othello’s realization that Iago is behind this heinous plot. The author uses the permanent destruction to reveal certain themes, including the consequences of love and the power of vengeance. Othello’s self-inflicted death further conveys…show more content…
Furthermore, in Othello the author, Shakespeare, uses Othello’s and Desdemona’s death to illuminate the various consequences of love and the power of vengeance. The author develops important themes leading up to and after Othello’s death scene. The play serves to show the audience the myriad of consequences love yields. Due to Othello’s distrust in Desdemona, he believes that Desdemona “must die, else she’ll betray more men” (V.ii.6). Othello’s severe distrust towards Desdemona is largely because of Iago’s attempt to convince Othello of Desdemona’s affair with Cassio. Throughout the play Othello battles between trusting his wife or trusting his seemingly loyal friend. Othello changes his perspective drastically moments before he inevitably dies. Othello starts Act V furious with Desdemona and slowly realizes how Iago misguided him so greatly. After Desdemona’s loyalty is revealed, Othello understands that Desdemona never betrayed him. Consequently, Desdemona falls victim to Iago’s vengeful plot. The author shows the “emergence of vindictive trends in a character constitutionally devoted to affirmative goals” (Keyishian 1). Furthermore, Iago’s achieves his main goals at the climax of the play…show more content…
From violent duals to envious revenge Othello’s death embodies the many consequences of previous events in the play. At the beginning of the play, Othello becomes general and appoints Cassio as second in command, but Othello does not even mention Iago. Quickly, envy builds inside Iago causing him to despise Othello. Iago methodically plans his revenge for Othello and ultimately accomplishes overall destruction and vengeance. Eventually, Iago “thoroughly unsettles Othello by making him believe that Desdemona has betrayed” him (Keyishian 3). The affect of Iago’s plot is so extreme that the consequences of it eventually cause Othello to take his own life. Surprisingly, Othello quickly submits “himself to Iago’s tutelage, turns his love into hate, and destroys Desdemona, then himself” (Eastman 1). All of this tragedy stems from Iago’s need for vengeance. The author uses Othello’s death to show all of the events that have led to this dramatic disaster. Shakespeare also uses Othello’s death to portray the theme of the power of vengeance. The idea that Desdemona would betray him hurt him deeply, but once Othello realizes he has killed her in vain he cannot live with the pain. After Othello’s death Cassio reminds bystanders that Othello is “full of heart” meaning he embodies love and kindness (V.ii. 776). Throughout the play, love frequently blinds Othello from
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