Constitutional Convention

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What problems would a Federalist have had with the articles of confederation and constitutional convention? A federalist (someone who believes in coexisting and strong federal and state governments) (Morone and Kersh 59) wouldn’t have liked the articles. This is mostly due to its structure (Morone and Kersh 53). Mainly, states had more influence than the federal government ("Independence and the Articles of Confederation."). In one case, because of one state, a tax couldn’t be raised (Morone and Kersh 54). The United States couldn’t fight wars either (Morone and Kersh 54; "Independence and the Articles of Confederation."), and other countries could abuse it (Morone and Kersh 54). In the end, there was compromise (Morone and Kersh 61). Therefore,…show more content…
The people at the convention couldn’t agree how slaves should be counted in official population measurements (Morone and Kersh 65). Population measurements would be used for tax purposes, and number of congressmen (“The Three-Fifth Compromise”) . Some southern states had a high percentage of slaves (Morone and Kersh 65). If we take that into account, then it is no surprise that southern states wanted slaves to be counted as whole people. Eventually though, it was decided that slaves would be considered 3/5 of a free person for official population statistics (Morone and Kersh 65). The result of this was that slave states would have more representation (“The Three-Fifth Compromise”). The reason for this number, was due to the theory that slaves could provide 3/5 the wealth of someone who wasn’t a slave (Morone and Kersh…show more content…
Was the Iraq invasion constitutional? The permission for congress to declare war is in Article 1 Section 8 of the constitution (Morone and Kersh 68). The last time that a true declaration of war happened was in 1942 (Franke-Ruta), so congress has declared war since 1941. Although, it was close. As for the constitutionality of invading Iraq, I believe it was constitutional due to the “necessary and proper clause” (Morone and Kersh 69). This clause at the end of article 1 section 8 (Morone and Kersh 68) states that congress can “make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States” (Morone and Kersh 69). Regarding Iraq, Congress “authorized force” (Franke-Ruta). Even though that doesn’t sound like declaring war to me, I believe that the clause I previously mentioned makes the invasion
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