Functional Obsolescence

794 Words4 Pages
If people could take some of their time to look cautiously the environment, buildings, monuments, as well as themselves, they could grasp that society has changed and suited itself on materialism. People are spending money on unnecessary stuff; consequently, they have lost the interest on achieving or reaching great advancements in society. In other words, they´ve replaced consumption over production. The extensive society´s consumerism can be viewed through shopaholics or whether through technology addicts leading materialism to be associated as an “overspending addiction”. People are now suffering emotionally although its cause still remains bias for them; for this reason, materialism should be criticized. In addition, someone who believes…show more content…
In 1954, Brooks Stevens an industrial designer made up the term “Planned obsolescence”. He specifically expressed in an advertisement conference that the term meant, “Instilling in the buyer the desire to own something a little newer, a little better, a little sooner than is necessary.” Regarding this term, Vance Packard, a social critic, divided the term into functional and psychological obsolescence. “Functional obsolescence” is the creation of a product that at some point it will be outdated and discontinued, forcing the consumer to change it. While “psychological obsolesce” was an announcement strategy, it persuaded the consumer a product was old-fashioned, making him or her buy another version of the product. This aspects show how everyday people are dominated, pressured and influenced by society yearning to be modernized. However, "'Everything is permissible for me'--but not everything is beneficial." (1 Cor. 6:12) Maybe people enjoy being on trend, but that does not mean it makes any good for them worst if they have an obsession of spending and accumulating
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