Cooperative Learning In Schools

1632 Words7 Pages
Cooperative learning is generally defined as a teaching arrangement in which small, heterogeneous groups of students work together to achieve a common goal. Students encourage and support each other, assume responsibility for their own and each other 's learning, employ group related social skills, and evaluate the group 's progress. The basic elements are positive interdependence, individual and group accountability, face to face interaction, interpersonal and small group social skills and group interaction processing. Human beings are social creatures by nature and cooperation has been used throughout history in all aspects of our lives. Therefore, it follows that cooperative learning groups in schools would be used as a logical teaching…show more content…
The social skills that are necessary for a student to perform competently in a small group are taught directly during cooperative learning. Often it is assumed, by teachers, that students can interact in a small group setting with little or no help – this is rarely the case. Simple small group social skills such as staying with one 's group, speaking in a low conversational voice, trusting other group members, managing intra group conflict, and the sharing of leadership responsibilities usually require specific and direct attention by the…show more content…
In this the social skills must be taught such as leadership, decision making, trust building, communication and conflict management skills. Group Interaction Processing Group members discuss how well they are achieving their goals and maintaining effective working relationships. It involves group self-evaluation. The purpose of group self-evaluation is to clarify and improve the productiveness of all group members in contributing to the cooperative efforts of achieving the group 's goals. Group self-evaluation provides for a type of group metacognition, a process of evaluating the group 's own processing. Group self - evaluation should result in describing what group member actions were beneficial and detrimental, and what group member actions should be continued or changed. Teaching Models Traditionally, models of teaching are represented by a broad array of teaching systems, each system containing a distinctive philosophical foundation, or theory of learning basis, with related pedagogical methodologies. Most models can be loosely fitted into one of four or five distinct families of educational psychology – social; information-processing; personal; behavioral systems are the traditional ones, with constructivist added lately. Models falling into the first four categories have strong histories of research, development, and usage as most have been both refined and tested in the field. Plus, each of these divisions, to include constructivism, has a distinctive theory
Open Document