Copper Stoichiometry Lab

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Introduction/Purpose: This report discusses an experiment done with copper metal. Several reactions were ran with it, which produced different copper compounds to in the end finally recover the original amount of copper. This experiment is important because it proved the Law of Conservation of Mass. The Law of Conservation of Mass states that mass is neither created nor destroyed. So after the last reaction is done there should be the same amount of copper as there was before you began. Material: Beaker Evaporation Dish Pipette Metal Copper Nitric Acid Litmus paper Sodium hydroxide Stirring rod Pure water Hot plate Beaker tongs Hydrochloric acid Aluminum wire Procedure: To begin the first procedure weigh your piece of copper…show more content…
The “Yields of Copper” chart show the different amounts of that were produced during the original experiment. The initial amount shows the amount that was used in procedure one . The final theoretical amount shows the amount of copper that the reaction for the fifth procedure should give you when using stoichiometry to find the amount of copper in that reaction. Conclusion: In conclusion, The results indicate that there was a yield greater than the initial amount. This could be caused by the rounding done when doing stoichiometry. Misinterpretations in the final experimental amount could be because of leftover aluminum wire. However, regardless of the yield being the greater amount, this experiment proves the Law of Conservation of mass. Appendix: This report discusses an experiment done with copper metal. Several reactions were run with it, which produced different copper compounds to in the end finally recover the original amount of copper. So after the last reaction is done there should be the same amount of copper as there was before you began. The results indicate that there was a yield greater than the initial amount. However, regardless of the yield being the greater amount, this experiment proves the Law of Conservation of
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