Coquetry In Relation To Sexualised Culture

1706 Words7 Pages
The study critiques the evidence of coquetry in relation to sexualised culture and young people’s sexual discourse, demonstrating how it displays masculinity. It argues that the field of coquetry is defined by inadequate methodology, and one-dimensional interpretation. It identifies a need to expand definitions of young people’s sexual verbal behavior to include a focus on activity and participation, including pleasure, performance and capacity to inform future steet discourse patterns. Coquetry is one of the attention-grabbing illustrations of the ways sexuality is captivating on new forms of street verbal behavior which disrupt older conceptions of its status and its place in society. Today, ‘sex’ may be an out of body practice, very intimately…show more content…
Giddens suggests that the revolutionary changes in which sexuality has become cauth up are more long-term than generally conceded. He sees them as intrinsic to the development of modern societies as a whole and to the broad characteristics of that development. Sexuality as we know it today is a creation of modernity, a terrain upon which the contradictory tendencies of modern social life play themselves out in full. Emancipation and oppression, opportunity and risk have become a part of a heady mix that irresistably ties our individual lives to global outcomes and the transformation of…show more content…
Within the context of a ‘pure relationship’ (Giddens, 1992), sex has become domesticated and intimate relationships are eroticized, though at the same time there is a tendency to conceptualize the erotic as a highly individualized form of pleasure-seeking which is pursued through discontinuous and uncommitted encounters and through forms of auto-eroticism. There has been a huge growth in the provision of commercial sex services such as escort agencies, lap dancing clubs and sex tours, as part of a ‘shift from a relational to a recreational model of sexual behaviour, a reconfiguration of erotic life in which the pursuit of sexual intimacy is not hindered but facilitated by its location in the marketplace’ (Bernstein,
Open Document