Corruption In One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

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One Flew Over the Cuckoos’ Nest Mental patients are ignored in society and are notorious for their own helplessness with their illness. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest written by Ken Kesey talks about constant struggle between what society wants versus what the patients need while constantly clashing with hospital staff. The book also introduces readers to a theme of power and it was seen through the way the staff and outsiders viewed them as patients; the battle of good versus evil. Kesey also uses real events of the U.S and problematic stances to help develop his story, from the unethical human experiments to problems of conformity. Ken Kesey in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest explores the corruption of mental institutions by showing …show more content…

Tha's right, mothah, that's right," and then shut the door and turn all the showers up to where you can't hear anything but the vicious hiss of water on the green tile.” (Kesey #).Chief Bromden recalls the process for new admission which includes this ravish shower. The staff that took care of the showers are described as the “black boys” and they take their job as amusing and entertaining, “where they strip him and leave him shivering with the door open while they all three run grinning up and down the halls looking for the Vaseline.” (Kesey #).David, a real patient in the 1960s, reveals the harsh environment of the hospital by writing in his journal, “At the moment I am physically and mentally incapable of doing anything. This is what they have done not for but to me.” (Hallam, Richard S.). The routines they have to complete become taxing on them, especially since the staff at the time did not explain the reasoning for the schedules and all the pills. Furthermore, not knowing why, allowed patients to get more paranoid and less …show more content…

These feelings were evident to the worker at the gas station and he exploited them making them feel bad for being out of the asylum. “Although he was holding down a semi-skilled job, this was no future for the intelligent young man that he was; and he was living in a squalid bedsitter.” (Hallam, Richard). There is always this underlying fear over mental patients, which block them from being any part of society even when they have the talent. Outsiders at the beginning are also ignorant, only hearing that its system supposedly improving, “Oh when I think back on the old days, on the filth, the bad food, even, yes, brutality, oh, I realize, ladies, that we have come a long way in our campaign” (Kesey

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