Corruption In 'The Trail's End'

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“If you 're still in need / Of something to read, / Here 's the story of Bonnie and Clyde” (Bonnie 3-5). Bonnie Parker’s poem “The Trail’s End” consisted of her perspective on the story of her and Clyde Barrow’s adventures. On May 24, 1934, the New York Times published an article entitled, “Barrow and Woman Are Slain by Police in Louisiana Trap”; this discusses the ending moments of Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker’s life, and how the authorities managed to eradicate the couple. Former Texas Ranger Frank Hamer fell short in finding the team at Black Lake. Several weeks after this incident, the ranger methodically planned the capture of this duo through the camping method – watchful waiting. Hamer tracked Barrow back to Bossier Parish where…show more content…
This means that the more time one associates with another, the more likely he or she is to conform to the other person’s behavior. To illustrate this, Clyde Barrow came from a poor family who was very close to one another. His older brother Buck turned to a life of corruption, and soon after he encouraged his younger brother Clyde to do the same. The younger Barrow’s endeavors intensified from petty theft to grand theft auto to armed robbery noted the 2015 Clyde Barrow article published on The Biography.com Website. The escalation of these events led to the downfall of Clyde…show more content…
This is an extension of Merton’s theory by Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin. They suggested that rather then crime being a product of having limited opportunities, it can develop through the accessibility one has (Macionis 228). In other words, criminal acts occur if the person is given the opportunity. This theory is more appropriate when discussing Parker’s criminal acts. She did not grow up similar to Barrow. Rather, she was raised in the suburbs of Dallas where no blatant signs explained her hunt for a new life (“Bonnie
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