Courtroom Observation

1520 Words7 Pages
Tuesday morning was an exciting, yet scary day to get started. The night before I was scouring the web, trying to figure out the details I needed to know such as how to get there, the court schedule that morning, what time I had to leave my apartment, what I had to take note of while I was there, etc. I did not want to waste my time being clueless at the courthouse, not knowing where to go or what to do. I wanted to be prepared for anything because I did not know what to expect. Growing up, I watched television shows like Law & Order: SVU, Suits, and How to Get Away with Murder, but never have I ever been to an actual courthouse and observed a case or hearing. It was going to be an entirely new, educational experience that I will take to heart.…show more content…
On the wall, we saw a sign that contained the direction of courtrooms numbers and their respective judges. Judge Susan H. Amini, courtroom E-960 was to the right. As we walked through the halls, multiple people were along the walls, sitting on benches and staring at us. I felt unwelcome like we did not belong. We were obviously college students with our huge backpacks and lost faces. I saw the disdain in their eyes as they glanced at us, wondering who are these kids and why are they here. I shook the feelings off, realizing that this a public place where anyone can be. I took a peek inside the courtroom. The door was locked with the lights off. No one seemed to be inside. Therefore, I decided to sit and wait with the multiple groups of…show more content…
I got to see a side of the criminal justice system that I have never seen before. After writing multiple papers on the War on Drugs, I am completely aware of the injustices it entails. Federal lawmakers impact lower-level, nonviolent drug defendants with their enactment of mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines, even though they are attempting to target high-level distributors. Incarceration of these people destroys their lives because a criminal conviction makes it harder to live a productive life as you are not eligible for certain jobs, loans, etc. All things considered, my experience at the King County Drug Diversion Court opened my eyes to some of the changes occurring in our justice system in regards to the War on Drugs. Our government is finally recognizing the tyranny it has caused. We are all human and are all not perfect. It’s humbling to witness these offenders, amidst their adversity of drug abuse, still hope and dream for a brighter
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