Critical Analysis Of Fahrenheit 451

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I quite enjoyed Fahrenheit 451. A 20th-century classic. The language features employed in it result in an interesting, if not slightly difficult read which provokes deep thought from the reader. Published in 1953, it describes a future American society where books are outlawed, and it is the role of ‘firemen’ to destroy any that are found. Montag, the protagonist, is a fireman and is happy however, after a conversation with the girl next door, he discovers he is completely discontented with how he has been living out his life, burning knowledge and encouraging stupefaction. He seeks to change how he and others are living out their oblivious lives and eventually quit his job to join a group of scholars who seek to remember the world’s greatest…show more content…
It is hinted that it is some sort of nuclear bomb that will be deployed and be so devastating to the world that the war will ‘finish as quickly as it started’. This event is very similar to the situation between Kim Jong-Un and Donald Trump, where there was a conflict that involved the potential release of nuclear weapons. The only differences between this case and the one shown in the book; is one the situation, in this case, was de-escalated, and two; the warning signs, and media coverage shown in Fahrenheit 451 were disregarded because people were too absorbed in their ‘families’ in their ‘TV parlours’ to show any sort of interest or attention to the outside world. When Montag was trying to get people to see, to understand, he had a ‘conversation’ with his wife, Millie, with him saying ‘Jesus God…How in hell did those bombers get up there every second of our lives! Why doesn’t someone want to talk about it…I don’t hear those idiot bastards in the parlour talking about it. God, Millie, don’t you see…’ but Millie just responds by ignoring Montag and having a conversation on the telephone with her friend about what was on in the ‘parlour’ that night. While Montag and his co-workers are playing poker in the firehouse ‘a radio hummed…show more content…
As I was writing this response more and more things were bursting into my head of things that I could write about, that made me feel something. This is one of the things I liked so much about this book. It made me think and theorise. ‘What would happen if…’ ‘Could this really be possible…’ ‘Could our society really resemble one like described in the book?’ Ray Bradbury did an excellent job of conveying his message, so much so that I think it should be mandatory to read this book. Not only because it is so good, but also because it would educate people on issues that are present in our society today, and hopefully prevent our society’s situation, on matters that Fahrenheit 451 covers, from becoming irreparably extreme. A truly good

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