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Pablo Picasso's Painting In The Foreground Is The Bridge

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This is a painting of the shores of the Thames river which the artist view from a nearby Brewery. In this painting an intense contrast of colours is seen. The sky is painted pale redish orange indicating the scene is during sunset. The buildings in the background are fresh green in colour which is complimentary to red. In the foreground is the Bridge, a few buildings and the shore by the river. He has represented the water in three different colours try to show reflection of the surrounding area. The dark blue colour of the water in the right is the colour of the water and the reflect of the bridge and the shadow it casts over the water. The yellowish orange colour represents the refelction from the sky. The green colour closer to the shore…show more content…
During Cubism artists stopped using perspective- which was a concept commonly used since renaissance.The use os geometric shapes and sharp lines to represent any image was highly used. Pablo Picasso

This is believed to be the painting of one of Picasso’s lover Dora Maar (photographer). This paiting represents a woman who is weeping all the time. It is a really good example of how much emotion can be revealed on a face. The tears roll down her cheeks changing colour- to a greyish white, which looks almost bone like. This could mean she weeps so much that the tears are corroding her skin leaving the bone visible. Her face is painted in yellow, which could mean she was cowardly and scared. Just looking at the image it is possible to feel the pain and hurt the woman in the painting is probably feeling.

Georges Barque
Piano and Mandola by Barque was painted in 1910.
The objects in this artwork can be recognized but appear broken into several pieces. Barque has incorporated musical notes, The music sheet, the piano and mandola in this art work. It is in a long portrait format. The art work appears two dimension. He has used shadow and light effect to give more intensity and deapth to the art
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