Cultural Awareness Self Assessment

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On February 6, 1997, I and my twin sister was born in the United States of America. In a city called Cleveland, located in the state of Ohio. The home of the Cavaliers. I was blessed in a home that only contained my sister and me at first, until it cumulated to four sisters, and baby brother, and my mommy. Having a mother who is completely biracial of Hispanic culture and African-American culture; I came out to have more than one culture I can relate to and the advantages that came with it. Like, for example; my experience with Latino food and soul food, having mixed hair, and learning a second language (Spanish) in which I’m still working on till this day. In addition to all that, my race is black, however my ethnicity comes from Puerto…show more content…
The two test that I took were the Cultural Awareness Self-Assessment and the How Tolerant are You Assessment by Koppelman. For the first assessment that I took, my results came out to be that I was “so/so in the knowledge of cultural awareness. My score was an eighteen which brought me near below average of needing serious improvement in my cultural awareness skills. I was pretty shocked I scored that low because I do feel personally that in order for me to truly understand someone’s culture; I have to experience it first-hand. Learning about their traditions, clothing, and values is something very interesting to me. On the other hand, I don’t feel like I isolate myself from learning about other cultures. I just haven’t had the time nor money to travel because to takes money to travel. Not saying there’s no other ways to learn about them, but the best way it to explore/travel, instead of reading about it in a…show more content…
I will expand my knowledge, experience and exposure to increase the likelihood of having an authentic, effective and meaningful interactions with my future students by allowing each student to really see the difference between who they are compared to their classmates. To teach them that internally “we” as humans are set up the same, but the different genetics of DNA allow us to uphold a different skin tone, different language, different hair texture, or even eye shape. That physically we are different and that each and everyone one of us hold great values, traditions, and cultures to share with everyone. Whether I incorporate this in literature by introducing a diverse story or by showing a great film that hits the concept of the idea of multiculturalism. My students will understand to appreciate themselves and others around them. To support one another and that they will know how to respectively disagree with someone as well. I could incorporate a debate seen in class that could teach them the skills on that. They will know that you don’t have to hate someone because they don’t think like you, dress like you, act like you, and or speak like you. My students will think critically and openly through real life cases and I would try to put them in someone else shoes and see how they feel from that persons’ viewpoint. My future students are the mark of possibly erasing
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