Postcolonial Migration

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INTRODUCTION During the last decade, exilic and diasporic discourses have emerged in relation to contemporary examinations of the nation and postcolonial migration within cultural criticism, resulting in shifting definitions and usages of the terms. With an increasing critique of the racialized formation of national identity, scholars in such diverse fields as feminist, postcolonial and cultural studies have questioned the rooted, static, and sedentary logic of modernity. Challenging narratives of purity and rootedness, diasporic discourses are positioned to dismantle nationalist constructions of belonging, linking body and space in seamless tales of blood and family with land and territory. While diaspora also emerges in…show more content…
More important, the migrants are not inevitably irrevocably cut off completely from the land of their breed. They themselves may retain physical and or mental contact with their homeland, often characterized by what is called “ the myth of return “. Their significant others, their folk back in the homeland as well as sections of the population in their land of adoption, may identify them as originating from and belonging to their homeland. This facet of migration has important implications for the formation of ethnicity among a migrant community and its relationship with other ethnic…show more content…
It has emerged as a distinct literary genre. Diasporic writings, also known as "expatriate writings" give voice to the traumatic experiences of the immigrants due to the clash of two culture or the racial discrimination they undergo. Immigration proves a pleasant experience only to a few who succeed in assimilating themselves with new geographical, cultural, social and psychological environment. Most of the Diasporic writers, immigration is an unpleasant experience. They often find themselves sandwiched between two cultures. The feelings of nostalgia, a sense of loss and anxiety to reinvent home obsess them, consciously or unconsciously. They voice the anguish of the people, living far away from their native land and being discriminated on the grounds of race, colour or
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