Cultural Differences In Canada

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Culture is commonly known as the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group of people, defined by everything from language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts. The Center for Advance Research on Language Acquisition goes a step further, defining culture as shared patterns of behaviors and interactions, cognitive constructs and understanding that are learned by socialization. Thus, it can be seen as the growth of a group identity fostered by social patterns unique to the group (Zimmermann, Live Science Contributor | February 19, 2015 08:29pm ET). It is therefore safe to say that the cultures are peculiar to people in different regions or geographical locations and sometimes as these people migrate, they…show more content…
In this project I will bring forward the cultural variations observed between the Syrians and the Canadians. Names: most parents in Canada pick names as they wish for their children and it doesn’t have to follow any particular pattern. Sometimes the names do not indicate any family relationship at all. However in Syria the parents choose a first name for the child followed by the father’s name and then the family name at the end. This is because of the value placed on family reputation in…show more content…
Also due to the influence of the west English and most especially French is spoken mainly to aid communication and interaction with visitors. Religion: in Canada there is freedom of religion and a tolerance for the multi-religious groups present in Canada. In Syria however the tolerance for other religious groups outside Islam was little pre-war, but that doesn’t exist anymore especially since the war started. Certain Muslim sects like the Kurds find themselves being hunted down and killed by the fundamentalist Islamic sects. Social habits: Syrian social habits vary on the area in which the person lives in and their social strata. in urban areas women are seen a lot more as they are often educated, have formal jobs, have access to travelling and interacting with people from other parts of the world. “Syrian society was traditionally extremely stratified. People from different classes generally do not socialize with one another, and people in the lower classes often adopt a humble attitude and an acceptance of their position. Class lines tend to coincide with racial differences, as lighter-skinned people hold higher economic and political positions and most of the people in the lower-ranked professions are
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