Cultural Differences: The Importance Of Intercultural Communication

1605 Words7 Pages
It is vital for intercultural communication to be understood in order for it to become more effective, and the only way that communication is certain to be effective is when the message that is received was as accurate as what the sender intended it to be. When the sender achieves their purpose of sending the message accurately, it is more likely to avoid misunderstanding and conflict among the parties. (Singer, 1987) With that said, cultural differences have been one of the main causes of many conflicts among nations over the years. As the attempts to communicate among cultures continue to deplete, it only generates a greater friction towards how they perceive and treat one another. A way to combat that growing gap is by strengthening intercultural…show more content…
While as the West drifted from the others, the rest still retained the more interdependent notion of the self. Although, it cannot be put aside that over the years, the remaining nations came to see the purpose of what the Westerners early on realize, so much so that they started to practice being self-reliant, which emphasizes the cultural value of individualism. According to Alan Roland (1988), a cross-cultural psychologist, all individuals possess three universal aspects of identity, and that is the individualized, familial, and spiritual identity. Although these aspects are present in all individuals, it does not necessarily mean that every person sees one individual the same as the individual perceive his or her self. Individuals, through communication with others, implement different identities depending on the perception of an individual to the others. This simply means that identities emerge when messages are exchanged between persons, but presenting the true identity is not a simple process; thus, interpretive perspective is being…show more content…
In this written work of his, he was able to differentiate how individual groups in a population affiliate themselves with another, in which they most often find themselves struggling for existence among one another. In terms of the treatment of the individuals within a certain group, it is evident that the relationship among them is peaceful, whereas towards other groups, they are antagonistic. By definition, according to Sumner (1960/1940, pp. 12-13), an in-group is a collectivity with which an individual identifies, while an out-group does not. The treatment and perception of the in-group towards the out-group is that of individuals that are lesser than them, while the in-group perceives themself as someone who is of greater stature by their standard. With that, a form of judgment clouds the mind of the in-group pertaining to the out-group as individuals who practice ways that are not ideal due to the fact that their values and behaviors are unfamiliar. For instance, an example of an imbalanced of treatment in groups caused by the difference between cultures is rooted from egocentrism. The derivation of the word egocentrism comes from the Greek words ethos (people or nation) and ketron (center), which means having the mindset
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