Sandra Lopez

818 Words4 Pages
Lopez, Sandra A. "Culture as an influencing factor in adolescent grief and bereavement." The Prevention Researcher 18.3 (2011). Print. Sandra Lopez, a clinical social work professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of social work, explains how disregarding the culture of a person who is mourning the loss of a loved one can be offensive. She gave the example of Michael Sanchez who was at grief because of the loss of his grandfather. Sandra Lopez tried her best to help him using guidelines to help people of different cultures deal with grief so she does not do anything that will offend their customs. Michael Sanchez who lives in the United States with his family and other relatives was able to remain in the United States because…show more content…
Ellis. "Cultural implications in the management of grief and loss." Journal of Cultural Diversity 9.3 (2002): 86+. Expanded Academic ASAP. Print. Sally Fletcher discussed how Health care providers do not take in or include a client’s perspective as an important part of their health care plan. Sally argues that it is important for health care providers to include cultural sensitivity in health care. Capers (1992) defines culture as the "example of educated practices, qualities, convictions, and traditions which are shared by individuals from a gathering and are normally transmitted to other gathering individuals through time" (p. 20). This is clear when Judith Templeton carefully interacts with Shaila Bhave by being culturally sensitive to the difficult experience she is going…show more content…
"Does Grief Vary by Age, as Well as by Culture?" Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services 41.11 (2003): 8-9. ProQuest. Print. Stephen Bailey questions the article, “Does Grief Vary by Age, as well as by Culture?” by asking the authors if it is helpful to distinguish between mourning as a sociological concept and grieving as a psychological concept. Paul T. Clements, one of the authors, replied and explained mourning as a social procedure, yet it is so naturally interlaced with grieving that to try and separate the two is not a simple undertaking, nor is it useful for researchers or clinicians. Paul Clements thinks this is brilliantly reflected in the term psychosocial nursing, on the grounds that paying little mind to whether youngsters and their families are grieving or mourning. What makes a difference most to them is the way they feel and the ways the procedure influences their everyday lives. Not discussing the demise does not make it go away. Discussing death using age-suitable and culturally applicable terms can give a foundation to versatile adapting. Shaila Bhave had to talk about it with her friend and Judith Templeton, just so all the drama going on in her head can be reduced. Paul Clements expresses that grief is not an endpoint but rather an adventure. It is regular for grief to be a deep rooted
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