Cultural Myths About Immigration

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Myths About Immigration There are many translators that work directly or indirectly with immigrants so I thought it would be interesting to write a series of posts on myths relating to immigration, especially immigration coming across the Mexican/ U.S. Border. Weak U.S. border enforcement has led to high undocumented immigration. Increased undocumented immigrants have led to increased border patrols and the building of fences. Enforcement strategy has been strengthened and urban entry points fortified. For decades we have increased our border security, but to no avail. Heightened border security and the building of border fences have done little to slow down the influx of immigrants coming across the United States border. This type of…show more content…
Border. Weak U.S. border enforcement has led to high undocumented immigration. Increased undocumented immigrants have led to increased border patrols and the building of fences. Enforcement strategy has been strengthened and urban entry points fortified. For decades we have increased our border security, but to no avail. Heightened border security and the building of border fences have done little to slow down the influx of immigrants coming across the United States border. This type of strategy has only succeeded in pushing border crossers into dangerous and less-patrolled regions, and increased the undocumented population by creating an incentive for immigrants not to leave. Some people would like to see a wall running along the 2000 mile U.S. /Mexican border. This would be extremely expensive. This wall would not stop immigrants from crossing, but simply move their point of entry to a point that is more remote, less patrolled and more dangerous. The results of this would be an increase in the number of deaths of immigrants, but also in decreased apprehensions. The current cost of apprehending people crossing illegally has gone up from $300 per arrest in 1992 to $1,200 per arrest in 2002 according to a study by the Cato Institute. The undocumented immigrant population has doubled, in spite of increased danger as the result of the heightened border security, and the human cost has been incredible. Previously, workers from Mexico and Central America would come to the U.S. to work temporarily and would then return home. This meant that the U.S. did not have a growing population of “illegal” immigrants. By making it more difficult for people to enter the US, we have ensured that these individuals do not leave
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