Cultural Production Analysis

1822 Words8 Pages
The concept of cultural production is very much discussed by many theorists under the context of capitalism. According to Marx, the ideology and values of the ruling class is spread to the working class through what Engels called, the “false consciousness”. Marx posited that the control of the ruling class over the means of production includes not only the production of goods but also the production of ideas, values and beliefs. The working class suffers from “false consciousness” in that they are beckon to believe that the dominant ideology is in the best interest of the entire society. Through this phrase of “false consciousness”, the realities of exploitation and domination are concealed and obscured, thus allowing the ideology and values…show more content…
Adorno and Horkheimer elucidated the cultural industry in the capitalist society as a condition of enlightenment that has taken over the social life of human by rationality. (Horkheimer, Max, and Theodor W. Adorno, 1972) The concept of cultural industry is a main aspect of late capitalism in which it markets the production of culture that is in opposition to “authentic culture”. (Horkheimer, Max, and Theodor W. Adorno, 1972) Unlike the “authentic culture” which is not goal-oriented, culture industry is subjected to economic success and profit maximization (also, the main focus of capitalism). Cultural products are created to appease the capitalistic mass consumers’ increasing demands for entertainment. Adorno and Horkeimer posit that the phenomenon of the mass-produced culture in cultural industry serves as a purpose to ensure the continued passivity and obedience of the capitalist mass consumers. Thus, the culture industry results in a commodification of human conciseness in which it denies the imagination and expression of the individuals and undermines the power and critical rationality of the…show more content…
As we enter school, we are constantly reminded by our teachers to study hard for tests and exams and that “practice makes perfect”. The idiom of “practice makes perfect” frequently used by the school ISA and sometimes the family ISA, posits that by doing something over and over again (which requires “hard work”), one can learn to do it well. Thus, this is in line with the expression of “hard work is the key to success”. As we enter into the workforce, we are motivated by our bosses to “work-hard” and that our “hard work” may valued by our bosses which enable us to get work promotion. Even through the media, the shows on screen often portray successful individuals having to go through a process of “hard work” in order to achieve their successes. It can be seen how the cultural value of “work-hard” is reinforced through many forms of ISAs and it is so pervasive that we view it as “true” that by working hard we are able to succeed in
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