Urbanization In America

1880 Words8 Pages
Envision that you are apart of strict traditional family, the only expectation they have of you is to be apart of the working class of America. Imagine believing that is all you can become in this world, due to lack of money and moral support from family, friends, and teachers. These are the struggles young Chicanos of America face, this is sadly someone’s harsh reality. The silent truth is that the youth of the Latin community face constant oppression in their own culture whilst trying to assimilate and progress in America. Immigrant parents are not given the opportunity receive proper knowledge to educate their children who want to hone their talents whether it is extracurricular activities like skating or helping on simple…show more content…
The author David Diaz in the book Barrio Urbanism: Chicanos, Planning, and American Cities states that, “In the mid-1900s.. The logic of social repression requires a functional rationale to legitimate a civil society in which segregation(in reality ethnic cleansing) and brutality are normative social constructions. The Eurocentric version of el barrio influenced the totality of urban public policy.. (Diaz 4). Urbanization one of the struggles the Hispanic community in Los Angeles have been dealing with for awhile it has been more apparent over the years. Many of the communities that have been destroyed to build new shopping centers or luxury lofts are in areas like Echo Park and Downtown Los Angeles. This directly affects Chicano families with low incomes, and are not able to afford to move out of their homes immediately. Moving from place to place can have residual effects on their children and might discourage them to further their education due to low incomes. Parents might encourage their children to work at a young age to help ease the burden of high rent rates in Los…show more content…
When they’re in society they must adapt American culture and the negative stereotypes. The authors Holleran and Waller argue that “Second generation Mexican American adolescents may hear origin and survival stories from their families that bear little resemblance to textbook, media, and popular accounts written from the perspective of dominant culture. They may feel pressures to identify as Mexican in their homes and communities, but to act “American” in school and work contexts.” (Holleran & Waller 4) Often times the Chicano youth might feel like they need to look or act American to be accepted by their peers. As Americans we shouldn’t encourage this mind set, and embrace each other’s diversity. Even though segregation is a part of the past, racism add stereotypes are still prevalent in the present. A common stereotype we hear is that most Hispanic girls are teen moms. This stereotype, has tainted the community’s identity over the years but in a recent study in 2016 it has challenge that assumption. In an article, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it states updated statistics that states, “While dramatic declines among Hispanic and black teens (51 percent and 44 percent, respectively) have helped reduce gaps, birth rates remain twice as high for these teens nationally compared with white teens.” This
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