Culture Shock Literature Review

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CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Introduction This chapter, is a review of the literature associated with culture shock, the chapter will cover the definitions, history and conceptual framework of culture shock under which the causes and symptoms of culture shock, the various stages of culture shock and the training of expatriates before they embark on their sojourn will be considered. Then the scope and importance of studies on culture shock will be discussed, followed by diverse culture shock models, and a brief description of the chosen research method. Lastly a brief summary of the chapter will be discussed. Definition, History and Conceptual Framework of Culture Shock According to Eickelmann (2006) “Culture Shock” has been a topic of research…show more content…
Meerand (n.d.) noted that scholars have identified four stages of cultural shock. Below are the various stages he identified; 1. The Simulation stage; at first, the expatriate will be full of excitement at the prospect of going to a new location, and will feel curious, excited, and fascinated by the new country upon their entry to a totally new environment. This period often lasts from a couple of weeks to half a year. Meerand (n.d.) 2. The Culture shock stage; at this stage the expatriate will interact with the host culture actively. Culture shock manifests itself as homesickness, boredom, irritability, hostility to the host culture, disappointment, frustration, confusion and anxiety. Meerand (n.d.) 3. The Adjustment stage; After the passing of the initial settling period, the expat will start to feel more ‘at home’ in his/her new environment as his/her understanding of, and empathy with, the host culture grows and develops hence the expat starts to feel more comfortable about his surroundings. Meerand…show more content…
al (2011) Qualitative research is an approach that allows you to examine peoples’ assumptions and paradigms. The importance of reflexivity and how to practise it is described using field examples. Qualitative research can be used for a wide range of applications. Qualitative methods are typically used for providing an in-depth understanding of research issues that embraces the perspectives of the study population and the context in which they live. Qualitative research is useful for exploring new topics or understanding complex issues; for explaining people’s beliefs and behaviour and for identifying the social or cultural norms of a culture or society. Therefore, qualitative research is most suitable for addressing “why” questions that describe processes or behaviour. Qualitative methods are also particularly suitable for examining sensitive topics, as the process of rapport building provides a comfortable atmosphere for participant
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