D. B Cooper's Case: The Hijacking Mystery

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D.B Cooper Mystery On November 24, 1971, on a dark and stormy night, a mysterious man with a black suit got on the Boeing 727 flight. He was known as the man himself "D.B Cooper." He appeared with a dark suit and sunglasses to hide his face. While he was ordering cigarettes on the plane, he showed a black case to the flight attendant containing a bomb. He wrote a note telling the flight attendant, "If you don't give me $200K in cash, food supply and 4 parachutes, I will bomb this plane." Immediately, the flight attendant told the pilot to stop over at Seattle Airport handing over D.B Cooper all the things he wanted. The Seattle Airport gave D.B Cooper $200K in cash, all stacked up in $20 bills. When the flight left off again, 45 minutes…show more content…
Ever since, no one knows where D.B Cooper had gone and the F.B.I has found at least 20 suspects in this case. However, this case still remains as one of the biggest aerodynamic hijacking mysteries. One commonly spread theory about D.B Cooper was that he died from falling off a plane. D.B Cooper had never had a lot of experience from parachuting off a plane. Based off of research, professional skydivers say you need at least 6 or 7 goes before surviving the jump D.B Cooper had experienced. Especially in conditions and weather like that, Cooper had to jump off of 3,000 meters altitude, which is pretty high in terms of jumping off a plane. According to the article, "The Legend of D.B Cooper," by Damn Interesting, the research shows the likelihood of D.B Cooper surviving the jump; a lot of the article is talking about when and where he jumped off the Boeing 727. Another research evidence is…show more content…
Richard McCoy was a former Vietnam veteran, a former pilot and a skydiver. Therefore, this means that if he were the suspect, he would have survived the drop. Anyways, in 1972, 3 months after the D.B Cooper incident, Richard McCoy hijacked a plane going to Denver, talking a massive $500K in cash. Richard McCoy gave the exact same instructions as D.B Cooper. However, D.B Cooper left more traces than D.B Cooper, getting caught already after 2 days. A reference of research, "The 8 Most Intriguing Theories About D.B Cooper," by I09 gives tons of supporting reasons about Richard McCoy and why he was the key suspect. An ex-FBI agent, named Russell Calame, has a book named, "D.B Cooper: The Real McCoy." This book shows why D.B Cooper and McCoy were actually the same people. Richard McCoy also left the same tie on the seat as D.B Cooper- with the same replica. In the article, "Top 10 Famous Disappearing's" by Abbie Hoffman, this article mentions about a boy finding $5,800 (wrapped in $20 bills) during 1980. He found this cash 5 miles northwest of Washington. As well as these points, Richard McCoy never accepted nor denied the fact that he was the mysterious D.B Cooper. When McCoy was directly asked if he was D.B Cooper, he simply said to the officer, "I don't want to talk about it." Additionally, the F.B.I agent who shot Richard McCoy said he felt like he shot D.B Cooper at the same time.

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