Daisy's Transformation In The Great Gatsby

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Renowned musician Bob Marley once said, “The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively” (BrainyQuote). The book The Great Gatsby by Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald is about a man named Nick Carraway, and his experiences with his neighbor, Jay Gatsby, as Nick makes his new life in New York City. While moving out east to pursue a career in selling bonds, Nick moves into a small house in a wealthy neighborhood. His next-door neighbor is Mr. Gatsby, a very rich man with a shady past. Mr. Gatsby grew up as a poor man with another name. He was born James Gatz, but later changed his name to Jay Gatsby as part of his transformation into a member of the upper crust of society. In the book The Great Gatsby by Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby is a great man because he is a decorated World War I hero, he is always faithful to Daisy, and he takes the blame when Daisy runs over Ms. Wilson. One aspect that highlights the greatness of Mr. Gatsby is his sacrifice to…show more content…
Despite his poor upbringing Gatsby falls in love with Daisy, a young woman from an affluent background. Her parents do not approve of their relationship, but Gatsby still promises to remain faithful to her when he leaves to fight in the war. While he is away, Daisy meets another man named Tom Buchanan whom she later marries. Although Daisy is married to another man, Mr. Gatsby refrains from entering into a relationship with any other women, and always keeps Daisy in his heart. Tom has many mistresses while he is married to Daisy, which further complicates the situation. Mr. Gatsby always longs for the past, when Tom was not in the picture. Gatsby said to Nick, “Can’t repeat the past? Why of course you can!” (Fitzgerald 116). One may say that his devotion towards Daisy is peculiar, but it shows the magnitude of his love for
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