Dances With Wolves Analysis

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The film Dances With Wolves is a moving, culturally significant American western film produced in 1990 and directed by Kevin Costner, who also plays the lead role of John J. Dunbar. It portrays a fictional account of the relationship between a soldier and a tribe of Sioux indians. In the beginning, Dunbar is an injured soldier who accidentally makes himself a hero while trying to commit suicide by riding his horse in front of the enemy. When given a choice for where he wants to be stationed he requests the frontier, because he wants to see it “before it’s gone.”While stationed alone at Fort Sedgwick in Dakota territory, he befriends the people of a nearby Lakota tribe. Dunbar’s involvement in the tribe and the relationships he forms with the people teach him and the viewer the value of intercultural communication and acceptance. Additionally, this is displayed in the recurring acts of gift giving throughout the film. Despite the friendly mood of the film and endearing way of portraying this…show more content…
It provides a unique insight into Lakota life and culture, and perhaps something further. To the civil war soldiers, the Lakota were wild and dangerous, just as a wolf would be. The soldiers shot at Two Socks just as readily as they would shoot at an Indian. John Dunbar wanted to get to know the people, to understand them, and eventually to become a part of them - in other words, he wanted to dance with them, and so he did. He pushed past the language barrier, at the same time pushing back their cultural differences to come together on equal ground. They learned to care for each other, support, and protect each other. Although this film was weak in historical accuracy, it was strong in promoting intercultural cooperation - something the world could use more of today. Imagine if everyone interacted with the same curiosity, and the same eagerness to learn and protect, as John Dunbar and the Sioux
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