David Mcclelland's Theory In The Achieving Society

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According to David McClelland in his 1961 book, “The Achieving Society” He recognized three motivators that he thought we all possess, a need for achievement, a need for affiliation and a need for power. Nevertheless, his ideas are like a bird that starts its flight from the sky. He does not discuss about the need for basic necessities and he does not confirm to his readers that his point of departure is his appreciation and ownership of some or the whole Package of Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. However, there is no stronger motivator than sleeping on an empty stomach. David McClelland’s work is mainly meant for managers and employers but there are skipped levels one has to go through before becoming an employee, a manager or an employer.…show more content…
Sirota’s three factor theory too presents three stirring factors that staff requires to continue motivated and energized in relation to what they're doing: equity/fairness, achievement, and camaraderie. Sirota's theory states that we all begin a new post with plenty of passion and inspiration to do well. However after some time, owing to bad group rules and poor labor circumstances, several of us lose our motivation and enthusiasm. This is diverse from McClelland's theory, which affirms that we all have one main stimulator that moves us onward, and this motivator is founded on our culture and life experiences. McClelland's Human Motivation Theory affirms that an individual has one of three main driving stimulators: the needs for attainment, affiliation, or power. These stimulators are not natural; we gain them through our culture and life practices. (https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/human-motivation-theory.htm). Sirota's theory states that we all begin a new post with plenty of passion and inspiration to do well. However after some time, owing to bad group rules and poor labor circumstances, several of us lose our motivation and enthusiasm. Sirota considers only one side of the coin which is bad group rules and poor labor circumstances and forgets that there is modern human resource management techniques which keep employees motivated and enthusiastic.

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