David Walker's Appeal Analysis

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In 1829 David Walker wrote the Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World. Walker pleas for the immediate abolishment of captivity and the same rights for Black people. This was a ground-breaking thing for a Black man to say openly at that time. It was also very risky. Because of what he was doing, Walker put his life in danger. Walker speaks with distinctive honesty and passion about the cruelty of slavery. An Christian himself, he signals out white Christians for their double standards in supporting slavery, and society that treated most people of African origin as non-human possessions to be bought, sold or disposed of at will. He debates that, compared with slavery at other times and in other places, slavery in the United States is the most awful in history. Walker begs Black…show more content…
Walker encounters the growing flow of racism that was clear at that time in anticipated changes. These involved a plan to transport all free Blacks from the United States to basically go to Africa. He analyzes Thomas Jefferson work, when Jefferson stated that Blacks were lesser to whites and should be detached beyond the reach of mixture. Walker noticed that such thoughts were an influential risk to the Black community and to the ability of real equality in the country. The Appeal had a really big effect on the countrywide argument about slavery Walker’s Appeal is the first constant written attack upon slavery and racism to come from a black man in the United States. The Appeal pressed the opponent movement in a more fundamental direction. In 1830, when the Appeal was put out, more than fifty Negro abolitionist groups already occurred across the country. And David Walker’s call for the instant elimination of slavery vibrated strongly with many Blacks. The David Walker’s Appeal also influenced the thinking of leading white opponents who formed
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