Death Be Not Proud Character Analysis

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Through the path of life there are obstacles that are often hidden by one's facades. In Leaving Gilead by Pat Carr, a novella taken place during the civil war, Geneva Birdsong is the mother to her eight year old Saranell, and wife of Colonel Birdsong. Because of Geneva's unwise decisions, she is unable to be a wife and mother, which leaves the Birdsong's slave, Renny to raise Saranell. Because of her circumstances, Geneva is unable to accept reality. If one allows it, the mistakes made in the past can impact their entire life including relationships and overall happiness. After Saranell begs for Geneva's attention towards the Pates, who are broken down, Geneva pretends to not recognize them. "Geneva gave them no more than a glance. 'We're too far away to tell who it is. Maybe it's Naomi Pate. Maybe it isn't'" (Carr 117). If Geneva admits one thing, she will have to admit everything. The thought of admitting her mistakes…show more content…
In Death Be Not Proud by John Gunther, Johnny Gunther faced a deadly brain tumor and was never able to accept reality (Chapter 1). Johnny was never able to accept the harsh reality of his brain tumor, even in his last days, unlike Geneva. This method worked well for Johnny: he kept himself driven, cheerful, and thankful while Geneva lived a bitter, regretful life. As Geneva was on her death bed, she reluctantly to admit her mistakes. "Then the mask said, 'I wasn't fair to your father. I shouldn't have married him"' (Carr 142). Throughout her married life, Geneva distracted herself with the facade of parties and emotional disconnection to her daughter because, at the thought of her mistakes, her brain couldn't handle it. Geneva was only able to accept reality on her death bed. The inability to accept reality is different for every human; some are able to use that as motivation to live a joyful life, while others go on with
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