Declaration Of Sentiment Analysis

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In July of 1848, New York’s Seneca Falls was the site of a two-day convention that has transformed the way many Americans viewed the historical mistreatment of women in the 1900s. Elizabeth Stanton had organized an unprecedented women’s rights meeting with about 300 participants – of both men and women – to protest the treatment of women in social, economic, political, and religious life. Authored by Stanton, the Declaration of Sentiments and is one of the major documents to come out the convention. The document explicitly follows the format of its model, the United States Declaration of Independence, but instead of justifications for American settlers to rebel against their colonial management, it details the “injuries and usurpations”…show more content…
Daughter of a distinguished lawyer and congressman, she was informally trained at home the practice of law by her father. Her family owned slaves but she would become an abolitionist. In her adult years, she would marry Henry Stanton in unique arrangement that hinted at her resentment for domestic confinement: the words “promise to obey” were removed from their oath. She would go on to attend the World’s Antislavery Convention, where she discovered her gender prevented her a seat and voice as a delegate in the proceedings. Likely insulted, Stanton law an inequality of women’s legal position. Her uncommon background did not detract from her beliefs and principles, rather they served to edify her. Stanton used her knowledge in penning the Declaration of Sentiments to decry men’s disenfranchisement of women, arguing for equality of rights for both…show more content…
In doing so, it also set the agenda for equality reforms in politics, education access, women’s suffrage, economic liberty, and an equal role in religious life. The Seneca Falls Convention and its major document made public to the nation the problem of the oppressive rules that placed women in a largely uncontested role of subservience. It is clear to note that Stanton’s declaration and the unprecedented convention from which it arose has carried other important implications for women’s status in American life. While it was not initially received well, this public assembly could still inspire others to organize similar functions throughout the country. Another place of consideration would be the role of men in the feminist movement as a considerable amount of them participated in the convention. Women participants had mixed feelings about how active men could be. Whether they should be able to contribute with speeches or to be banished from the conventions. Perhaps both sides were justified in their hesitations because women were advocating for their rights at a time when legislature was dominated by
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