Democracy Vs Democracy

1425 Words6 Pages
Not only is democracy often presumed to be a peculiarly Western cultural product, it is also presumed that the cultural connections are directly related to a “classical world”, which is itself construed as inherently “Western”, thereby excluding possible non-Western connections. This labeling, thus, constructs an idea that the “West” is the sole historical purveyor of domestic norms. It means that democracy is viewed to carry out the interest as well as the identity of Western countries and, therefore, its universality idea is disregarded. Democracy is being placed in a universalist form by the West and, therefore, assumed¬¬ to be less culturally neutral by the non-Western. Beyond this, the institutions and outcomes reflect a certain ethic…show more content…
It is strongly associated with the idea that citizens have the sovereignty that is acknowledged by the government. Historically, constitutional individual liberties that embrace the legal protection of life, freedom of opinion, and property rights are included in John Locke’s theory of property. In the Two Treaties of Government, Locke opposed the claim that God had made all people subject to a monarch because he believed that men are by nature free and equal. Whereas functionally, individuals freedom can only be achieved in a government operating under the secure rule of law where the state is bound to follow the effective law and acts according to clearly defined prerogatives. Therefore, individual liberties, rule of law, as well as an active and legally secured public sphere are important elements that can guarantee the principle of freedom. Furthermore, freedom seems possible only where all citizens without exception have equally guaranteed political rights by the government. This leads us to the second principle of democracy, which is equality, or particularly called as political…show more content…
One can argue that it is a rather abstract principle of equality, but then it leads to a more concrete feature that can explain the process of democratic governance. The concrete feature of political equality is the full inclusion of all persons subject to the legislation of a democratic state. Hence, political equality aims at the equal formulation and equal consideration for all citizens’ interests and requires the capability of every government to accommodate it regardless of the subject of majority or minority. The equal formulation that every government can provide in order to develop a good democratic regime is by giving an equal chance on participation to all citizens. The failure to do so will harm the country’s democracy. As Arend Lijphart, a Research Professor of Political Science from University of California, claims, “Unequal treatment will heavily constrain the quality of a democratic system because the privileged voters are favored over underprivileged non-voters.” Consequently, the core challenges of a democratic system is guaranteeing and balancing freedom and equality of all citizens. And, in order to keep both normative principles in a dynamic balance, a further principle of the democratic rule is highly needed:
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