Desdemona In Othello

1923 Words8 Pages
William Shakespeare is a name unknown to few. As one of the world’s most prominent playwrights, there is hardly a student who has failed to read at least one of his plays. In fact, “no writer of any land or age has ever had the popularity and renown on such a colossal and astounding scale” as Shakespeare has (Brown). Despite pronounced eminence, very little is known about Shakespeare personal life foregoing his upbringing in rural England during the late 16th, and eventual move to London where he began his career. However, as with many writers, Shakespeare’s own experiences likely had great influence in his work. One impeccable example of this is the play Othello, which opens with a man, Iago, ranting about his anger that Othello, a superior…show more content…
Her significance stems from how relatable she was to women of the time. As a female who is generally oppressed by her society, and especially the men around her, such as Othello when he kills her simply for rumors that she may have cheated on him, the majority of women who came to watch Othello would resonate with the strength she carries herself with without any recognition. She even attempts to claim that she killed herself to save from ridicule Othello as she dies. Considering that women in the early 17th century would have had, and utilized, the ability to go to the theatre and support plays they enjoyed seeing, it makes very much sense that Shakespeare would have appealed to them in this way (Crowley). Thus it is likely that Desdemona’s, and Emilia’s, honest developments were influenced by awareness of a female audience. Furthermore, Shakespeare doubtlessly wrote Othello as somewhat of a social commentary on the patriarchal society in which he was living. Generally, women were thought of as “subjects” to the men in their lives, and were to be used at their disposable, doing whatever they demanded (Iyasere). Shakespeare even clearly points this out by means of Emilia’s speech early in the play, discussing with Desdemona why Othello was acting so aggressively about his lost
Open Document