Development In Human Resource Development

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Modern HRM supports learning and change developments by changing itself and help the managers to reach success. Training is essential for organizational development and their success. It is fruitful to both employers and employees of an organization, where an employee will become more efficient and productive if he is trained well. Therefore, to recognize education and training as lifelong learning, in fact contribute significantly to promoting the interests of individuals, organizations, the economy and society as a whole, particularly when considering the critical challenge of achieving full employment and to sustain economic growth in the global economy. This report provides the study and findings of examining the practice of HRD in my…show more content…
In fact, there are different views, definitions and scopes of HRD, however, most focus to enhance learning for individuals, groups and organizations within its business objectives (Reid, Barrington and Brown, 2004). More often these days a business’s external environment is reflecting the issues of sustainable development, and companies have to take this into account in a much more serious way than they had to in the past. People are much better informed about issues and many believe there are higher expectations on how today businesses behave. LEGO begun to source their products and manufacturing worldwide due to globalization of business. Unfortunately, labour standards are not complied and practiced in every country commonly. In 1997, the LEGO Group developed a set of guidelines that formulated in their Code of Conduct, to ensuring that suppliers are expected to meet the labour standards, human rights, the environment and anti-corruption (UN Global Compact Case Study,…show more content…
This refers to the Harvard (Soft) and Michigan (Hard) models from the 1980s (Alan Price, 2011). According to Storey (1989), the Michigan Model (Tichy et al., 1982) focuses on the resource side of human resources, emphasizes costs and places control firmly in the hands of management and their role is to manage numbers effectively, by keeping the workforce in the closely matched with the requirements in terms of both bodies and behavior. In contrast, the Harvard Model (Beer et al. 1984) stresses the human aspects of HRM in terms of communication and motivation. People in this model are led rather than managed, and they are involved in determining and realizing strategic objectives instead. Hence, “An organization’s HRM policy must fit with its strategy in its competitive environment and with the immediate business conditions that it faces” (Beer et al, 1984). So, linking some or all of these systems can allow more intelligent use of HR applications. For instance, using an integrated human capital management system, a company could assess hiring strategies by tracking new employees’ performances after they are hired or apply incentives methodically and or based on "soft" goals such as effective
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