Devil's Guard By Robert Elford Chapter Summary

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It is almost universally understood that the winners of war often write history. With this concept comes the acceptance that history can and is construed in a way that benefits the winner and can hide the truth. In George Robert Elford’s book, Devil’s Guard, Elford accounts for the perspective of a former Waffen SS officer who joined the French Foreign Legion upon the conclusion of World War 2. Throughout this story, many obstacles, adventures, and morals are explored that communicate various perceptions on what war (particularly the war in Vietnam during the French occupation) was like. The book conveys various arguments such as the exploration of unconventional warfare and the struggle of decisive action when the chain of command has …show more content…

This was conveyed through the mentality of the main character and the Germans in the Foreign Legion Battalion. Throughout the book, the author appears to convey the Germans as brave, intelligent, and bold throughout the entire book as they battle the Viet Minh in Southeast Asia. Not that I would oppose or pretend to understand the true character of the soldiers in Vietnam, but throughout the book, their pasts are almost completely disregarded and their actions admired. These were soldiers who by definition were associated with the same men who exterminated over six million Jews in the holocaust. Soldiers of this kind of history usually carry this throughout their lives and more, yet in this book, the French and the author disregarded and almost justified the actions of the Waffen …show more content…

He also subliminally formulates various arguments about unconventional warfare and decisive action. While his writing style is impeccable and leads to progressive tension that grasps the reader at the very beginning, he lacks the ability to verify any of these accounts ever happened. Unfortunately, Elford was never in nor served in this “Battalion of the Damned” and wrote this book on the knowledge of only eighteen days worth of interviewed tapes with Hans Josef Wagemueller whom he had met in a bar. The authenticity of this book is questionable, which can really taint the

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