Diane Rayor's The Greek Tragedy Of Helen Of Troy

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The Greek tragedy that has been recently translated by Diane Rayor, a professor at GVSU in the Classics department, formerly known as Helen of Troy now “Helen” at Grand Valley State University Directed by Karen Libman, the drama director at GVSU. This play was originally written by Euripides. This production features a unusual twist on the classic tale of Helen of Troy by presenting an alternative story of the Trojan war. This essay will be exploring the many features and functions of Greek production and all of the issues, including culture, and the productions that are involved which will include the demographics as well as the double-institutional frame of the production. Translating a Greek tragedy is not very common. Rayor had translated…show more content…
But the most effective way to increase is by the title recognition. For instance, seeing Helen on the billboard people could get an idea of what it could have been about but not a full understanding. The way that GVSU does the production work financially is by taking the “ticket revenue and putting towards the next event.” The ticket proceeds help also as Lane claims. Although the university does support the theatre financially also to a certain degree. Lane quotes that, “it’s very hard to make a profit off of the theatre because of this.” At the college, Lane could have increased marketshare if they would have made it clear how to get to the performance at the college. Finding the venue was challenging because there were no signs that the event was even going on. The parking was free which helped bring people in but they could have charged a few dollars to increase…show more content…
He played all of the back ground music and the music was composed by himself in choral odes. In comparison, the Greek tragedy Medea poses choral odes also which makes the play very attention-grabbing due to the unison of voices. The 12 women chorus sang in harmony together which was very captivating to the audience as a few smiles peeked in the audience. Towards the end of the play the chorus was chanting (Choral ode) and it became very horrific in a way that frightened the audience, lighting struck, lights we shut off, and the back drop LCD had a spinning effect that put everyone in a
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