Dickens V. Johnson Case Summary

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Case Citation: DICKENS BY DICKENS v. JOHNSON COUNTY BD. OF EDUC. NO. CIV-2-86-91. 1.Facts: Explain the essential facts of the case. Tell the story of the case. Involved in this case were Ronnie Allen Dickens, who was a minor at the time, Louise Dickens who was next friend, Helen Louise Dickens, and Dan Ira v. the Johnson Board of Education, Gerald Buckles, and Martha Riggs. Ronnie was a student at Mountain City Elementary School in Johnson County Tenn. Ronnie was in the sixth grade. ("DICKENS BY DICKENS v. Johnson County Bd. of Educ., 661 F. Supp. 155 (E.D. Tenn. 1987)") Ronnie’s teacher Martha Riggs decided to place Ronnie in a “Timeout” because of his disruptive behavior. Ms. Riggs had attempted other strategies with Ronnie but they were not successful. The “Timeout” area was made of cardboard from a refrigerator box that was around five feet tall. Ms. Riggs had it standing against a wall in the room and it had three sides…show more content…
Rationale: This is a very important part of the case brief. You must explain the gist of the court ruling, (i.e., why the court arrived at its holding). The court ruled that even though Ronnie’s punishment was prolonged and uninterrupted and may also be unconstitutional claim they felt that it was not considered to be too harsh and it was not outrageous. They also ruled that it was rational and related to a legitimate purpose. The court found that there was no merit to the claim that there was indifference and that it was deliberate. ” Ingraham v. Wright. Supra, 430 U.S. at 668-70, 97 S.Ct. at 1412. The Supreme Court specifically held that the Eighth Amendment is inapplicable to discipline imposed in the schools.” “The prisoner and the school child stand in wholly different circumstances, separated by the harsh facts of criminal conviction and incarceration.... The school-child has little need for the protection of the Eighth Amendment.” (“DICKENS BY DICKENS v. JOHNSON COUNTY BD. OF EDUC. (n.d.)”) 4. Holding: The ruling of the
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