Difference Between Euthanasia And Assisted Suicide

1287 Words6 Pages
For people who are pet lovers, they want to give their pets all the love and comfort, they can. They want to know they are making the kindest decisions for them. These decisions become difficult if their pets are sick or older. Euthanasia is a method of solving the problem of suffering towards the end of life. To perform the euthanasia, first a catheter or needle will be inserted into a vein in your pet’s front or back leg (Beck ). The euthanasia process can be used to end the suffering of dying humans as well. Laws and personal beliefs make euthanasia a controversial topic. However, euthanasia, or assisted suicide, can relieve the pain and sadness towards the end of a person’s life. Although assisted suicide is a controversial issue in the…show more content…
Those are Switzerland, Colombia, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, England, Canada, and some states of the United States including California, Colorado, Washington, Vermont, and Oregon ( Dignitas ). The Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg permit both euthanasia and assisted suicide. The difference between euthanasia and assisted suicide is that euthanasia is an intervention undertaken with the intention of ending a life to relieve suffering, but assisted suicide is any act that intentionally helps another person kill themselves. The five US states permit assisted suicide only. The second doctor must see the patient to confirm they are terminally ill and their request is valid ( Penney ). Only the Netherlands and Belgium permit euthanasia for patients under the age of 18. In the Netherlands, patients between the age of 16 and 18 may request euthanasia or assisted suicide. In 2010, the rate of euthanasia in the Netherlands has remained fairly stable at 2.8% of all…show more content…
There are four common criticisms against physician assisted suicide. First, critics say physician assisted suicide endangers the weak and marginalized in society. In some countries which allow assisted suicide, like Netherlands, there have been many cases where doctors gave lethal drugs without a request from patients and failed to report this to authorities. Critics of assisted suicide believe that safeguards against wrongdoing may not be enough. Second, physician assisted suicide may change the culture in which medicine is practiced. Critics believe that medicine should be used to heal rather than kill. They think that allowing physician assisted suicide poisons the relationship between doctors and patients. Third, physician assisted suicide would harm our entire culture, especially our family and intergenerational obligations. People who care for disabled or elderly relatives may view them as burdens and may pressure them to choose assisted suicide ( Anderson
Open Document